Why So Many Medieval Manuscripts Depict Violent Rabbits?

Medieval art sure is weird. We’ve already featured People Happily Dying, Battle Snails and Cats Licking Their Butts galleries. For some strange reason medieval artists also loved painting violent rabbits on a murderous rampage. If you have any idea why, please leave a comment below.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

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Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

Rabbits were really violent in medieval times.

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415 Comments

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  1. Anonymous March 8, 2020

    «Watership Down »

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  2. Anonymous March 8, 2020

    The hare, called by its Latin name lepus, represented a person that has respect for God and puts its trust in His divine powers, rather than trusting its fellow humans. Therefore, medieval manuscripts abound with representations of Jesus surrounded by hares. They are also associated with fertility.

  3. Marshall March 8, 2020

    This reminds me of a cartoon characters from the early 1940s that my mother told me about, called Crusader Rabbit. And we all know what bastards the Crusaders were.

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  4. Leah March 9, 2020

    Not gonna lie looks like all these pictures are taken from the same book

    Mite just be a coincidence from the artist from this book

  5. Anonymous March 9, 2020

    “you jknow jwho” – read it out loud with the “J” to understand why Hildegarde’s post is anti-semitic drivel.

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  6. Lee March 9, 2020

    As part of their stained glass and interior decoration, several medieval cathedrals included illustrations of virtues and vices. The vice of cowardice was depicted as a knight running away from a rabbit. Notre Dame, in Paris, has no fewer than three such medallions of the ‘Killer Rabbit’.

  7. Glac March 9, 2020

    All I know is that Bugs Bunny is one cwazy wabbit!

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  8. Ernesto March 10, 2020

    The problema we have before our eyes is that of hegemony and rebellion. Rabitts and hares are minor game, animales that almost everyone can chase and hunt. They also are famous for being highly reproductive and nervous and easily frightened. So the those rodents can well be symbol of the medieval villagers or simple people who live inside very strict limits in the Middle Ages, and fear and physical repression frequently helped to keep them inside those limits. So the rebellion of the rabitts and would come to represent the rise of of villagers and repressed people against superior and their methods. A type of counter-hegemonic discourse that uses ‘the logic of the World upside down’ (Bakhtin) in order of propose resistance without making it openly or risking to the perils of doing so.

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  9. Mikjikjpipuqwes-skw March 10, 2020

    The post of Hildegarde has nothing to do with anti-semitism, people want to read in this what they want to read and their pride or their religious pride gets hurt with some ancient truth that religious ceremonies are based around pagan ritual like the ritual of Ishtar which now it’s called Easter…… So there. The ecumenical council of nicea Incorporated in Christianity all pagan rituals and turned them in Christian celebrations, And so It goes with the other two popular religion like Judaism and Islam, isn’t it funny that all their religious holidays somehow fall around the Christian holiday and they all copy from each other basically and fundamentally from paganism, they had to convince pagans to join the new revolution of faith and control on humanity, so there is ishtar the evil goddess portrayed as the rabbit because that’s what our ancestors pagans saw her as….
    But you don’t have to take my word for it…. Get an education Google it, learn off encyclopedias, go to the library and research, or whatever you use to have some culture, do it….

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  10. Baxter March 10, 2020

    Most of the manuscripts were produced by cloistered monks. If you were locked up, starved, never had sex, and worked to death, you would hallucinate a lot of crazy stuff.

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  11. Ernesto March 10, 2020

    Sorry for the wrong words and lack of concordance in some points of the comment. It’s just my writing assistant got loony sometimes.

  12. Carel March 12, 2020

    Run, farmer, run, farmer, run run run,
    Here comes the rabbit with his gun gun gun

    (That amused my kids many years ago.)

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  13. Anonymous March 24, 2020

    A. Hares not rabbits ears are too long . Rabbits were a delicacy and originally not native to Britain until the normans started to farm them.
    B. Ergot. The mould on the grain used to make the commonest bread was rye. Ergot poisioning caused hallucinations depending on the concentration in the bread ( high amount death) add in fasting and hard work . Monks were the hares rebelling against the rules as many were younger sons who would have preferred life in the secular world.

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  14. Anonymous April 29, 2020

    Ever met a rabbit? They are violent little shits.

  15. doormat June 29, 2020

    Exactly 💯 1 perfect 👌

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